Library

Product Downloads

BOC offers a range of product information for download in support of our products. To view a products MSDS, brochure, operating manual, technical data sheet or other resource please choose the product you wish to view from the navigation menu above to see the documentation attached to that product.

BOC Guidelines for Cylinder Safety

BOC is committed to practising and communicating safe operations around the world as part of its commitment to robust product stewardship. It is as important for BOC to impart safe working methodologies to customers and suppliers as it is to have clear, established and measurable performance standards practised by all BOC plants, depots and distributors – regardless of plant, product or service.
 

Fundamentals of Flux and Metal Cored Arc Welding

Welding Technique: Successful flux and metal cored arc welding depends on the following factors:

  • Selection of correct consumables
  • Selection of the correct power source
  • Selection of the correct shielding gas
  • Selection of the correct application techniques:
  • a) Correct angle of electrode to work
  • b) Correct electrical stick-out
  • c) Correct travel speed
  • Selection of the welding preparation

 

Fundamentals of Metal Inert Gas (MIG) Welding

Welding Technique: Successful welding depends on the following factors:

  • Selection of the correct consumables
  • Selection of the correct power source
  • Selection of the correct shielding gas
  • Selection of the correct application techniques:
  • a) Correct angle of electrode to work
  • b) Correct electrical stick-out
  • c) Correct travel speed
  • Selection of the welding preparation

 

Fundamentals of Manual Metal Arc (MMA) Welding

Welding Technique: Successful MMA welding depends on the following factors:

  • Selection of the correct electrode
  • Selection of the correct size of the electrode for the job
  • Correct welding current
  • Correct arc length
  • Correct angle of electrode to work
  • Correct travel speed
  • Correct preparation of work to be welded

 

Manual Metal Arc (MMA)

Manual Metal Arc (MMA) welding is an electric arc welding process in which the arc is struck between a covered metal electrode and the workpiece. The central metal electrode or core wire is consumable to provide the filler metal for the weld. Shielding of the weld pool is provided by the decomposition of some components of the electrode covering.

Overview

  • MMA welding is the most flexible and one of the most widely‑used arc welding processes
  • The process uses an electric arc to fuse joint areas
  • The consumable electrode consists of a metal core wire covered in a concentric clay-like mixture
  • The process may be operated with an AC or DC power source
  • This process requires highly skilled welders to produce good‑quality welds
  • The process does not require a separate shielding gas

 

GMAW (MIG)/FCAW/MCAW

Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)
GMA – commonly referred to as Metal Inert Gas (MIG) – welding embraces a group of arc welding processes in which a continuous electrode (the wire) is fed by powered feed rolls (wire feeder) into the weld pool. An electric arc is created between the tip of the wire and the weld pool. The wire is progressively melted at the same speed at which it is being fed and forms part of the weld pool. Both the arc and the weld pool are protected from atmospheric contamination by a shield of inert (non-reactive) gas, which is delivered through a nozzle that is concentric with the welding wire guide tube.

Flux Cored Arc Welding
Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) uses the heat generated by a DC electric arc to fuse the metal in the joint area, the arc being struck between a continuously fed consumable filler wire and the workpiece, melting both the filler wire and the workpiece in the immediate vicinity. The entire arc area is covered by a shielding gas that protects the molten weld pool from the atmosphere. FCAW is a variant of the MIG process and, while there are many common features between the two processes, there are also several fundamental differences.

Metal Cored Arc Welding
Metal Cored Arc Welding (MCAW) uses the heat generated by a DC electric arc to fuse metal in the joint area, the arc being struck between a continuously fed consumable filler wire and the workpiece, melting both the filler wire and the workpiece in the immediate vicinity. The entire arc area is covered by a shielding gas, which protects the molten weld pool from the atmosphere. As MCAW is a variant of the MIG welding process, there are many common features between the two processes, but there are also several fundamental differences.

 

Laser Gases

Laser Cutting
A focused laser beam is used to melt or chemically degrade the material being cut. The process uses an assist gas jet to remove the molten material and, in the case of oxygen, to react chemically with the material to produce additional thermal energy. The choice of assist gas depends on the material being cut.

 

Preheating of Materials - Consumables

What is Preheat?
A heating procedure applied to parent metal components immediately before welding commences, and considered as an essential part of the welding operation, is called ‘Preheat’. Preheating can be applied locally to the areas to be welded, or to the whole component. It is usually done to raise the temperature of the weld area so that the weld does not cool too quickly after welding. This protects the material being welded from the various adverse effects that can be caused by the normally rapid cooling cycle created by the welding process.

 

Submerged Arc Welding (SAW)

How it Works
SAW uses the arc struck between a continuously fed electrode and the work piece to melt the metal in the joint area and provide additional filler metal under a blanket of granular flux. This arc is completely submerged under the molten flux, which protects the molten metal from the atmosphere. There is no visible arc, spatter
or fume during the welding operation.


GTAW (TIG) Welding

The Gas Tungsten Arc Welding – commonly referred to as Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) – process uses the heat generated by an electric arc struck between a non-consumable tungsten electrode and the workpiece to fuse metal in the joint area and produce a molten weld pool. The arc area is shrouded in an inert or reducing gas shield to protect the weld pool and the non-consumable electrode. The process may be operated autogenously (without filler), or filler may be added by feeding a consumable wire or rod into the established weld pool.

  • The addition of filler is optional
  • Only inert or reducing gases can be used as the shielding gas
  • TIG welding is a high quality, versatile and commonly-used process
  • TIG is suitable for welding ferrous and non-ferrous materials
  • The TIG process can be run on DC-, DC+, or AC

 

Welding - Definition

Wikipedia defines welding as a fabrication or sculptural process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence.

Click here to read the full article...